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Instruments of Liberation

INSTRUMENTS OF LIBERATION (PART 1)

Can you hear the cry for Justice?

Our streets are stained with the blood of the innocent, the cries of the oppressed are faint to the ears of those who care more about prosperity, power, and the protecting the american way than the freedom of brown and black people.  This socio-economic and political climate we are in troubles my soul! A land where social, political, and economic oppression runs rampant in the dawn of day and by night the public lynching and victimization of the racially oppressed….

My God, can we hear the cry for Justice from our brothers and sisters?

Of recent, while spending time in scripture reading, praying, and meditating,  the witness of Moses became a central focus of emphasis kind of ruminating in my heart.  Specifically, as the author of the book of Hebrews records the choice Moses made in Hebrews 11:24-26

24 By faith Moses, when he had grown up, refused to be known as the son of Pharaoh’s daughter. 25 He chose to be mistreated along with the people of God rather than to enjoy the fleeting pleasures of sin. 26 He regarded disgrace for the sake of Christ as of greater value than the treasures of Egypt, because he was looking ahead to his reward.

Moses chose to leave the seat of authority, comfort and prestige to take up the plight of the oppressed, the lowly, the slave.  For the Lord, Moses chose not just the position of understanding the slave but becoming one of the slaves.  Moses chose to suffer the cost of slavery to glorify God by connecting with God’s suffering people.

As Christians, the Gospel of Jesus Christ calls us to rely on our faith to uphold the cost of rejection, imprisonment, the price of freedom in light of God’s greater reward before us.  The witness of Moses reminds us that faith in God empowers us (all) to act on behalf of the innocent and oppressed.

Listening to the teachings from Rev. Dr. Raymond Rivera, keynote speaker at the Covenant Justice Conference 2016 lit a fire in my bones.  Hearing Rev. Rivera introduce Captivity theology, as being an instrument of liberation through four models of ministering in the midst of captivity was impactful and insightful.  Of the four models, one stood out to me: Confrontation, because it was developed out of the biblical account of Moses confronting the fallen system of egyptian captivity.  

Like Moses in this passage, we have a choice to make.

If you can hear the cry for justice, how will you respond?

1 Comments

Rev. Dr. David Holder on October 25, 2016 12:42am

Yeah, confrontation hit me hard because it is the path of greatest resistance. Once you confront systemic forms of oppression you are really putting yourself out there. As I stated at the Justice Conference during the afternoon panel, I have pastor friends who avoid talking about racism and oppression from the pulpit because it would severely divide their churches. But my response to that is before Jesus came to reconcile He came to divide--mother from daughter, father from son. We should never temper and exclude talking about the gospel message of justice because we are afraid of what the people will do. The responsibility of the preacher is to correct and rebuke as well as to encourage. They were shocked that I could freely preach about the justice issues of the day.... We have truly lost our way when preaching can't be confrontational.

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